Before You Redesign Your Company

Before You Redesign Your Company

If you are in business, it’s very likely that you’re thinking about the design of your organization.

You’re not alone.

According to Deloitte, most companies believe organizational redesign is a critical issue. In fact, 92 % of participants in a 2016 global human capital study believe it is important or very important.

“Fast-moving global markets and digital disruption have forced companies to innovate rapidly, adapt their products and services, and stay closer than ever to local customers. This has prompted a resurgence of interest in business organization.”

Organizational redesign is always well intentioned. The impetus is born out of one of those “we can’t continue to do things this way” moments. Soon, you have a good reason, a compelling reason for change. Markets shift. Innovation begets new products and services. A fresh design anticipates future opportunities. It all sounds good. But, that doesn’t diminish the fact that change is change.

Redesign is change. When companies restructure, revolutionary ideas create waves that ripple through the entire organization and people are bound to react. What if responsibilities change? What if reporting relationships change? What if the way you give and receive information changes? Wise leaders recognize that successful restructuring is not based on whether the changes make sense to the design team. Success will be based on whether the people who are affected engage, participate in the process, then own and implement the change. When it comes to redesign, people matter.

Gothelf and Seiden have suggested that leaders develop the ability to “Sense and Respond.” Here are a few principles that provide some guidance for discussion prior to and during a redesign initiative. Pick one and discuss with your team.

  1. How well do you create two-way conversations?
  2. Do you have a healthy focus on outcomes?
  3. Do you embrace continuous change and continuous processes?
  4. What is your current level of collaboration
  5. What evidence can you present that you have a learning culture?
It's only fair to share...Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn